column

Columns (3)

Lets keep playing with the cube. Now with increasingly open cubes, that this time turn around themselves in the three axis while they go up, so we have a vertical column.

columna-a1 columna-a2 columna-a3 columna-b1 (2) columna-b1 columna-b2 (2) columna-b2columna-b3The geometrical code for this last image is as follows (povray again):

#declare cubhuec= difference {

 box {<-1.05, -1.05, -1.05> < 1.05, 1.05, 1.05> pigment{ color rgbf<.54, .55, .99,0>} } 
 box {<-1, -1, -1.3> < 1, 1, 1.3> pigment{ color rgbf<1, .3, .2,0>} } 
 box {<-1, -1, -1.3> < 1, 1, 1.3> rotate <0,90,0> pigment{ color rgbf<1, .3, .2,0>} } 
 box {<-1, -1, -1.3> < 1, 1, 1.3> rotate <90,0,0> pigment{ color rgbf<1, .3, .2,0>} } 
}

#declare hcolumn=7;
#declare n=0; 
#declare ndiv=1;
#while (n<ndiv)
object {cubhuec scale <1,1,1> rotate <360*n/ndiv,360*n/ndiv,360*n/ndiv> translate <0,0,n*hcolumn/ndiv> }
#declare n=n+1 ;
#end

box {<-10, -10, -4> < 10, 10, -1.2> pigment{ color rgbf<.99, .99, 1,0> } } //floor

Columns (2)

collumn1

Well, let’s do for a moment something that could seem like what Michael Hansmeyer has done. He worked with cubes, altough he decided to subdivide the cubes like folding them; here the issue will be simple rotations of the cube, that can give you unexpected results. Hansmeyer has used in his works processing, a graphic software that is open source and free, and I’m using here something older, albeit somehow simple and effective, povray, which also happens to be free to download and use at will (some are even using it to 3d print sugar elements…). In the end, this could be a design for a part of column.

column2

If you ask the cube to spin around a vertical axis, you get in the end a cylinder (the upper image is made of just 10 cubes, so it is not still there).

column3

But if you gently ask your cube to rotate also around an horizontal axis as it turns around the vertical axis, some things start to happen. The upper image shows 10 iterations of that, and the lower one 100 iterations.

column4 column-b-1

To better grasp what happens, lets use two slightly shorter red and green slabs in the upper and lower parts of the rotating cube…

column-b-2 column-b-3 column-c-1

Shape becomes rather flamboyant (and, to be honest, not architectural at all) when you change the proportion of the green and red companions.

column-c-2

10 iterations

column-c-3

100 iterations

column-c-41.000 iterations

The geometrical code for that last image is, in pov terms, as follows:

#declare n=0; 
#declare ndiv=1000;
#while (n<ndiv)

 box {<-1.1, -1.1, -1> < 1.1, 1.1, 1> translate <0,1.5,0> rotate <0,360*n/ndiv,360*n/ndiv> pigment{ color rgbf<1, .9, .5,0>} } 
 box {<-.1, -1, -.1> < .1, .1, -3.1> translate <0,1.5,0> rotate <0,(360/ndiv)*n,(360/ndiv)*n> pigment{ color rgbf<1, 0, 0,0>} } 
 box {<-.1, -.1, 1> < .1, .1, 3.1> translate <0,1.5,0> rotate <0,(360/ndiv)*n,(360/ndiv)*n> pigment{ color rgbf<0, 1, 0,0>} }
 sphere { <-1.1,-1.1, -1> 0.5 translate <0,1.5,0> rotate <0,(360/ndiv)*n,(360/ndiv)*n> pigment{ color rgbf<.7, .8, 1,0>} }
 sphere { <1.1,1.1, 1> 0.5 translate <0,1.5,0> rotate <0,(360/ndiv)*n,(360/ndiv)*n> pigment{ color rgbf<1, .5, .5,0>} }

#declare n=n+1 ;
#end

Columns (1)

Granada-1

Columns have been a concentration of architectural knowledge as well for structure as for decoration. Upper image, Alhambra, Granada, and lower image, the christian cathedral of Granada, both taken during the same travel.

The third image is from a place I have not visited in person, but which was really impressive to see in the motion picture “Orlando” (Sally Potter, 1992): Djuma Mosque, in Uzbekistan.

Granada-2

Djuma mosque, an image by Rye Kizuka on Picassa